Research Poster Display

NEW FOR 2021! Virtual Poster Display

The goal of the OFVC Poster Session is to highlight research on fruit, vegetables and alternative crops in Ontario. The following posters are the official entrants of the competition allowing growers and members of the ag-industry to see the excellent work being done in support of the many commodities they grow. Congratulations to all participants who demonstrated some amazing work.

Student Poster Competition - 1st Place

The effect of plant age on the susceptibility to replant disease of American ginseng
Authors: Amy Fang Shi and Sean Westerveld (OMAFRA)
University of Guelph

Ginseng replant disease (GRD) prevents successful cultivation of ginseng on the same land twice, even decades after the first crop. In this study, we found that older ginseng is more susceptible than younger plants to GRD in a replant garden. Therefore, it is important to manage the disease early even though above-ground symptoms are not observed during the first and second year.

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Student Poster Competition - 2nd Place

One test for all: Detection of grapevine viruses using probe-based high throughput sequencing
Author: Abdallah Meknas
Brock University

Virus diseases have a devastating effect on the long-term health status of grapevines. Detection is the first step in the management of grapevine virus diseases. Although methods to detect individual viruses are available, these methods fail to provide a comprehensive detection of multiple viruses with high sensitivity. This study aimed to develop and validate a virus detection method using high throughput sequencing technology that could be used to detect multiple viruses infecting grapevines using a single test. This method has tremendous potential to use in domestic clean plant programs to help produce virus-free grapevine planting material as well as in international quarantine programs.

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Student Poster Competition - 3rd Place

Alternative Spray Programs for Management of Cercospora beticola on Sugarbeet
Authors: Christine Dervaric, Cheryl Trueman
University of Guelph

Management of Cercospora leaf spot (CLS) is challenged by fungicide resistance and insensitivity. Therefore, research on alternative fungicides is needed to ensure growers have access to multiple fungicides with different modes of action. Here, we assess the efficacy of alternative and registered fungicides for management of CLS.

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Student Poster Competition - Participants

Genome wide association mapping for spear quality and andromonoecy traits in asparagus
Authors: Gurleen Sidhu, Travis Banks, David Wolyn
University of Guelph

My PhD research is on Asparagus. My research project title is "Determination of genetic architecture for traits important in asparagus breeding program." PhD Research Highlights:
a) Development of high density SNP linkage map in asparagus.
b) Determination of genetic architecture for in vitro response to micropropagation, andromonoecy and spear tip quality.
c) Assessment of genetic variation in asparagus cultivars adapted to different regions and bred for different purposes.

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Survey and evaluation of native heteropterans for biocontrol in Canadian greenhouses
Author: Paige Desloges Baril
University of Windsor

Canadian growers are faced with the challenge of controlling pest insects amidst increasing insecticide resistance and deregulation of many conventional insecticides. Native predacious insects may be a promising biocontrol solution; therefore, I surveyed the Greater Sudbury region for predacious hemipterans in two families (Miridae and Nabidae) in disturbed and undisturbed habitats. Of the many predators surveyed, two Dicyphus species appear to be the most promising candidates for both greenhouse and field biocontrol.

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Assessing the predatory capacity of Nabis americoferus: a native biological control agent of greenhouse pests
Authors: Andrew LaFlair1,2, Sherah Vanlaerhoven2, Julia Mlynarek1, Roselyne Labbe1
University of Windsor

Tuta absoluta, a leaf-mining moth, is devastating the Eurasian tomato greenhouse industry. It has so far resisted our commonly used pest management strategies. However, a new biological control agent known as Nabis americoferus native to Ontario may potentially protect Canadian crops. Using Ephestia kuehniella (European Flour Moth) eggs, N. americoferus achieved great voracity and consumed upwards of 80 eggs in 24 hours for one individual through experimental feeding trials. Among its other promising traits and its close relation to other popular biological control agents, the promise of N. americaoferus is continually being investigated.

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Cold tolerance of the pepper weevil (Anthonomus eugenii)
Authors: Fernández, D.C, VanLaerhoven, S., Sinclair, B., and Labbé, R
University of Windsor/AAFC-Harrow

Temperature determines insect distribution and in the case of insect pests, it can be used as a supplementary tool in integrated pest management programs. Sporadic outbreaks of the pepper weevil have occurred recently in southern Ontario causing economic losses to the pepper industry in the area. Here, we used different measurements in the field and the laboratory to assess the ability of the pepper weevil to survive winter low temperatures in southern Ontario and determine its potential for establishment. Our preliminary results suggest that the weevil do not survive freezing events and that even temperatures above freezing can cause mortality.

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Biological control of the pepper weevil using the parasitoid wasp, Jaliscoa hunteri
Authors: Serena Leo, Cynthia Scott-Dupree, Roselyne Labbé
University of Guelph

One main difficulty of controlling pepper weevil is its cryptic nature. However, using the parasitoid wasp Jaliscoa hunteri as a biological control agent offers a unique solution in its suppression. By releasing the wasp onto infested ornamental pepper plants, we found a 65% reduction in the number of emerging pepper weevil offspring in buds and a 25% reduction in fruits.

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Enzyme treatments impact positively tannin extraction in Pinot noir and Cabernet sauvignon red wine from Niagara
Authors: Charlène Marcotte, Belinda Kemp, Debbie Inglis
Brock University

The perceived quality of red wine is influenced by taste, mouthfeel and colour. These parameters are modified by tannin content in wine. Grape seed tannins contribute to the bitter and astringent mouthfeel in red wines, while grape skin tannins play a major role in wine colour stabilization. In cool climate grape growing regions like Niagara, grapes are often harvested with a low skin tannin concentration, when the grapes not fully ripened. This can result in wines that are high in astringency due to an over extraction of seed tannin in an attempt to extract as much skin tannin as possible, which negatively impacts quality. The main objective of this project is to improve the overall quality of red wine in Ontario by optimizing winemaking techniques of Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir based on tannin concentration. This poster presentation focuses on Saignée and pectolytic enzyme addition as tannin management strategies.

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Potential for Sterile Insect Technique as an IPM Tool for Control of Pepper Weevil in Field and Greenhouse Crops
Authors: Basso, Jacob; Labbe, Roselyne; Scott-Dupree, Cynthia
University of Guelph

The sterile insect technique could prove to be a sustainable and cost-effective tool to manage pepper weevil outbreaks in Ontario greenhouse pepper crops, which synergizes with existing IPM tools implemented for this pest. This work will lay the foundation for a pepper weevil-sterile insect technique system.

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